The Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment – Revised (IPPA-R)  

Babity M., Bíró V., Nagy L.
First author's affiliation: PTE-BTK, Pécs, Hungary

Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) developed by Armsden and Greenberg (1987) is a self – report measure of attachment for children and adolescents. In line with Bowlby’s attachment theory, the IPPA measures psychological security derived from relationships with significant others, e.g. mother, father, (trust, communication, alienation). The aim of the present study was to generalize the results of Armsden and Greenberg’s (1987) three – dimension model of adolescents’ attachment to their parents in a group of Hungarian adolescents. Two samples of adolescent students who ranged in age from 10 to 15 and 16 to 18 years were investigated. Among the participants there were children living in families and foster cared. In our survey good internal consistency were found for the IPPA with Cronbach’s alpha coefficients ranging between 0.717 and 0.898 for the sub-scales across both the parent and peer subscales. Good test-retest reliability was found in both samples of adolescents over a three-week period. There were differences between children living in residential care or living in families on the three subscales. The rate of trust in their mother was lower among boys living in residential care compared to boys living in their own family. The rate of trust in their father was lower among girls living in residential care and the highest rate of trust was found among the younger adolescents. Communication with mother is significantly lower among children living in residential care (both girls and boys), and the highest rate of communication was found in older adolescents girls. We got significant differences in alienation – the rate was higher among girls living in residential care.